Get More Out of Your CTSI Grant Applications

Junior Investigator Funding Pathways blog image
The CTSI is implementing a new forum this May to help junior investigators become independently funded. In addition, several “funding pathways” will be introduced that set a framework for investigators to revise their scientific proposals for KL2 Mentored Career Development and CTSI Pilot awards into proposals for K or R21 awards from the National Institutes of Health.

The twice monthly Research Methods Forum will focus on multidisciplinary research methods and will offer investigators the opportunity to share research ideas and receive constructive criticism from their peers. The forum is open to investigators of all ranks whether or not they are applying for CTSI funding. However, junior investigators will particularly benefit from the opportunity to interact with potential collaborators and receive thorough feedback on their proposed research early in project development.

Of course, the main goal and benefit of the forum is to help junior investigators obtain funding and progress to independence and the CTSI’s new funding pathways will facilitate this. The pathways guide investigators through a process to repurpose existing CTSI grant proposals for new funding opportunities. Timelines are also included in the pathways to ensure investigators don’t miss important submission deadlines. That means an investigator could submit a KL2 application in November, and use it for the base of a K08 or K23 application in February.

Funding pathways currently exist for both NIH K award-eligible and non-eligible investigators and both pathways encourage submission for NIH awards while the CTSI award applications are still under review. CTSI funding decisions will not be influenced by whether an investigator also applies for a NIH award.

Junior investigators interested in applying for funding through one of these pathways must present their research ideas at the Research Methods Forum at least 2-4 months prior to submitting their KL2 or CTSI Pilot award applications. Watch the CTSI weekly update for reminders about upcoming Forums.

To learn more about CTSI funding opportunities and pathways or the Research Methods Forum, contact researchhelp@urmc.rochester.edu.

Career growth

Scholar Spotlight: Vankee Lin

CTSI KL2 scholar Vankee Lin, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor in the School of Nursing and Department of Psychiatry, shares her research on Alzheimer’s Disease and memory in aging adults.

The KL2 Mentored Career Development program provides 2 years of support for new investigators interested in a career in clinical or translational research. The program is designed to support the career development of those who wish to pursue research careers in multidisciplinary clinical and translational science.

Read more about the KL2 program, and check out a list of our current and past scholars.

CTSI welcomes new trainees and scholars

researchOn July 1, 3 new KL2 scholars and 8 new CTSI Year Out trainees began their projects that are funded by the CTSI’s KL2 Career Development Program and Year Out (ART) Program for Medical Students.

KL2 scholars

Beau Abar, PhD
Mentor: Manish Shah, MD, MPH
Project Title: “Examining Barriers to Treatment for Depression among Older Adults”

Megan Lytle, PhD
Mentor: Vincent Silenzio, MD, MPH
Project Title: “Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health disparities/suicide prevention”

Suzannah Iadarola, PhD
Mentor: Tristram Smith, PhD
Project Title: “Parent-Focused Intervention for Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders”

Year Out trainees

Josef Bartels
Mentor: Ronald Epstein, MD
Project: “The Qualities of Science”

Michael Geary
Mentor: Regis O’Keefe, MD, PhD
Project: “Modulation of the prostanoid receptor EP4 to reduce scarring during flexor tendon healing”

Trevor Hansen
Mentor: Richard Phipps, PhD
Project: “Thy1 Expression as a Marker and Therapeutic Target for Scar Formation in Capsular Contracture following Reconstruction Mammoplasty”

Kelly Makino
Mentor: Anton Porsteinsson, MD
Project: “Advance Care Planning in Early Dementia Study”

Kyle Rodenbach
Mentor: George Schwartz, MD
Project: “Crystatin-C-based renal reserve in children with history of hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated acute kidney injury”

Lauren Roussel
Mentor: Howard Langstein, MD
Project: “Evaluating Upper Extremity Function Following Mastectomy in Reconstructed and Non-Reconstructed Women with Breast Cancer”

Elizabeth Saionz
Mentor: Jeffrey Bazarian, MD, MPH
Project: “Post-concussion progesterone decline in female athletes”

Lindsay Wahl
Mentor: Patricia Sime, MD
Project: “One Protein, Multiple Functions: The Role of Tissue Transglutaminase in Pulmonary Fibrosis”

CTSI welcomes new trainees and scholars

Person showing welcomeThe CTSI welcomes the following scholars and trainees that will begin their funded projects on July 1:

KL2 Scholars

Beau Abar, PhD (Mentor: Manish Shah, MD)
“Enhancing patient access to appropriate medical care across the lifespan, with a particular emphasis on access to substance abuse and other psychiatric treatment”

Suzannah Iadarola, PhD (Mentor: Tristram Smith, PhD)
“Mindfulness-Based Intervention for Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders”

Megan Lytle, PhD (Mentor: Vincent Silenzio, MD, MPH)
“Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health disparities/suicide prevention”

CTSI Year Out Trainees

Josef Bartels (Mentor: Ronald Epstein, MD)
“The Qualities of Science”

Michael Geary (Mentor: Regis O’Keefe, MD, PhD)
“Modulation of the prostanoid receptor EP4 to reduce scarring during flexor tendon healing”

Trevor Hansen (Mentor: Howard Langstein, MD)
“Thy1 Expression as a Marker and Therapeutic Target for Scar Formation in Capsular Contracture Following Reconstruction Mammoplasty”

Kelly Makino (Mentor: Anton Porsteinsson, MD)
“Advance Care Planning in Early Dementia Study”

Kyle Rodenbach (Mentor: George Schwartz, MD)
“Cystatin-C-based renal reserve in children with history of hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated acute kidney injury”

Lauren Roussel (Mentor: Howard Langstein, MD)
“Evaluating Upper Extremity Function Following Mastectomy in Reconstructed and Non-Reconstructed Women with Breast Cancer”

Elizabeth Saionz (Mentor: Jeff Bazarian, MD, MPH)
“Post-concussion progesterone decline in female athletes”

Lindsay Wahl (Mentor: Patricia Sime, MD)
“One Protein, Multiple Functions: The Role of Tissue Transglutaminase in Pulmonary Fibrosis”

To learn more about the CTSI Year Out program, click here. To learn more about the KL2 program, click here.

CTSI KL2 scholar wins competitive fellowship

Matt-KottmannMatt Kottmann, MD, a CTSI KL2 scholar from 2010-2012, received a highly competitive Parker B. Francis Fellowship grant. Like the KL2 award, the Parker B. Francis Fellowship supports junior investigators on their path to independence. Matt’s project for the CTSI KL2 was  “Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligands and Pulmonary Fibrosis.” The CTSI KL2 Career Development Program supports junior investigators for 2 years who are interested in a career in clinical and translational research. The next RFA for the CTSI KL2 award will be released in September 2013. More information on Matt’s award can be found at the Research @URMC blog.

CTSI Featured Personality: Mireya Gonzalez-Begne Felhazy

Dr. Felhazy joined the Clinical and Translational Science Institute’s Mentored Career Development Program (also known as Felhazythe KL2 Program) in July, 2009. Her research involves the identification of biomarkers for Sjögren’s Syndrome, an underdiagnosed autoimmune disease of the salivary system, and the characterization of the salivary proteome in subjects with and without the disease. Read the abstract of Dr. Felhazy’s project.

Multidisciplinary teamwork is a hallmark of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute and the KL2 Program, and Dr. Felhazy has been extraordinarily successful in bringing together a diverse team of experts. “The KL2 Program has given me the opportunity to work with many different researchers, both inside the Medical Center and across the country,” says Dr. Felhazy. Her collaborators include her mentor, Dr. Ignacio Sanz and Dr. Jennifer Anolik, from the Department of Medicine, Allergy/Immunology and Rheumatology; Dr. Rob Quivey from the Center for Oral Biology; Dr. Gene Watson from the Salivary Gland Dysfunction Center; Edwin Van Wijngaarden, Ph.D. from Public Health Sciences; Dr. Anthony Almudevar from Biostatistics and Computational Biology; Dr. John Yates ΙΙΙ from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, CA; and Dr. Michael Iadarola and Dr. James E. Melvin from the National Institutes of Health.

Says Dr. Sanz: “Mireya created a network of scientists that has substantially improved our understanding of Sjögren’s Syndrome. Her work, and her collaborators, should lead to treatments that will improve the health of people with Sjögren’s.”

The KL2 Program also allowed Dr. Felhazy to take courses in clinical and translational research at the Medical Center, including Principles of Biostatistics, Principles of Epidemiology, Experimental Therapeutics and Practical Skills in Grant writing. In addition, the program provided the means for her to be trained in multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) mass spectrometry. “The knowledge and skills I gained through my coursework and training have allowed me to take my research in new directions,” says Dr. Felhazy.

Dr. Felhazy’s success as a Career Development Scholar was recognized at the 2010 annual meeting of the Society for Clinical and Translational Science, where her poster received the first place award.

Related Publication

Salivary anti-Ro60 and anti-Ro52 antibody profiles to diagnosis Sjögren’s Syndrome. Ching KH, Burbelo PD, Gonzalez-Begne M, Roberts MEP, Coca A, Sanz I, Iadarola MJ. J Dent Res. 2011 April; 90(4): 445–449

Abstract

Dr. Felhazy will present at the Mexican Proteomics Society meeting in Puebla, Morelos, Mexico in November, 2011.