Why are you harassing me Nicole O’Dell?

By Nicole L. O’Dell, MLS31739_1507832462226_2941135_n

You see my name in your inbox, and you think to yourself, “Not her again!!!! What does she want now?!?!” I understand your pain, but I admit it: I am a harasser. That is my job. As the Senior Information Analyst for the Clinical and Translational Science Institute, I am charged with the daunting task of collecting evaluation data for a multi-million dollar Federal grant. It is not easy, and it requires information to be collected from many different sources, most likely including you.

Don’t despair! If I contact you for information or to complete a survey there is probably a GREAT reason behind it. spam0607Here is a list of the most common reasons that I will be in your inbox:

  1. You’re a faculty member: Congratulations!! All that hard work and schooling paid off and now you are officially a member of the faculty at highly respected University. The CTSI highly regards the opinions of the University of Rochester faculty and often surveys them for awareness of and satisfaction with our services and programs.
  2. You are a funded investigator: Congratulations!! You have successfully obtained a grant, which is not easy feat! The CTSI is interested in the research climate at the University and periodically collects data from you about your projects and research collaborations.
  3. You received funding from the CTSI:  Congratulations!! You were picked out of a group of very strong candidates to receive support through our pilot funding or educational programs! The CTSI surveys awardees and trainees twice per year about outcomes that resulted from the support and any success stories you would like to share.
  4. You utilized CTSI programs or services: The CTSI offers a vast array of services and programs that assist investigators at the University in conducting clinical and translational science. Our offerings include expert consultation services, the Clinical Research Center, the Center for Community Health, the Research Navigator Program, and others. The CTSI collects information about your use of these services and the benefits that result, such as publications and grants.

In closing, I would like to say that I am a human being, not an evil robot. I am actually quite nice in real life. If you would like me to stop harassing you, the solution is quite simple. Just send me the data.  And thank you for helping us improve the CTSI’s programs and services and show that we’re using federal funds wisely.

CTSI Seminar: Dietary influences on breast cancer

Healthy-Foods-For-Prevent-Breast-CancerLuke Peppone, PhD will be presenting a lecture on “Dietary influences on breast cancer” for the Tuesday, December 3rd session of the CTSI Seminar Series.  Dr. Peppone, along with Dr. Alissa Huston and a team of researchers from University of Rochester, Roswell Park Cancer Institute and Washington University have published an article on the effect of various vitamin D supplementation regimens in breast cancer patients. Click here to access the article.

The theme of the Fall CTSI Seminar Series is “From Test Tube to Table: Understanding the Evolving Science of Nutrition Research.” The series takes place on Tuesdays from 12:15-1:15 pm in the Helen Wood Hall Auditorium. You can access the full schedule here. Lunch is provided. Please provide your own beverage. The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry designates this live educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

CTSI Seminar: The role of nutrition in the etiology and treatment of autism: From food dyes to supplement use

autismpuzzleSusan Hyman, MD, Brianne Schmidt, RD and Pat Stewart, PhD, RD will be presenting a lecture on “The role of nutrition in the etiology and treatment of autism: From food dyes to supplement use” for the Tuesday, November 26th session of the CTSI Seminar Series.  Dr. Stewart summarizes the seminar:

Selective and repetitive eating patterns are a hallmark of autism.  Dietary supplements and special diets are often implemented in attempt to improve nutrition and/or the behaviors associated with autism.  There is little data on whether these restrictive diets and supplements are efficacious. We are one of the first group of researchers to test the use of the gluten free casein free diet in children with autism using a double blinded placebo controlled intervention and to investigate whether the supplements used provide the nutrients consumed in inadequate amounts in the diet  or led to excessive consumption.  We will review the diagnostic criteria, outline nutritional concerns, and discuss the results of our studies on  the GFCF diet and supplement use in children with autism.

The theme of the Fall CTSI Seminar Series is “From Test Tube to Table: Understanding the Evolving Science of Nutrition Research.” The series takes place on Tuesdays from 12:15-1:15 pm in the Helen Wood Hall Auditorium. You can access the full schedule here. Lunch is provided. Please provide your own beverage. The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry designates this live educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

A or B? B or A? What’s a provider to do?

apple vs orangeWhich is better: drug A or behavioral intervention B? The CTSI might be able to help you figure it out. We just released a new online training resource for people interested in an introduction to comparative effectiveness research. The site consists of 10 modules covering the basics of comparative effectiveness research, from definitions to methods and applications. Each module includes a narrated PowerPoint presentation and a brief quiz so you can check your understanding. Faculty from the URMC, Morehouse School of Medicine and the University of Toronto present the material. Connect to the site here.

For an expert consultation in comparative effectiveness research, contact the CTSI Research Help Desk at ResearchHelp@urmc.rochester.edu.

The modules were originally developed with the support of a supplement to the University of Rochester’s Clinical and Translational Science Award, grants number UL1RR024160 and UL1TR000042 from the National Institutes of Health.

CTSI Seminar: What Engages People? A look at Self-Determination Theory

ryanrichardThe November 12th session of the CTSI Seminar Series will feature a presentation by Richard M. Ryan, Professor of Psychology, entitled “What engages people? Self-determination theory research on motivation in learning, health care, virtual worlds, and other domains.” Self-determination theory was initially developed by Edward L. Deci and Dr. Ryan at the University of Rochester, and has been elaborated and refined by scholars from many countries.

The motivations behind behavior can vary, and not all motives have the full support of the self. Self-determination theory (SDT) distinguishes people’s motivation in terms of the degree to which it is self-regulated or autonomous, versus being regulated by rewards or pressures that are experienced as controlling. People’s quality of engagement, persistence and well-being are strongly affected by how autonomous or controlled they feel while acting. Moreover, SDT details how motivation is affected by the styles and strategies of motivators from parents and teachers, to managers, coaches, and health-care professionals. In this talk Dr. Ryan will provide an overview of SDT research on motivation and well-being, with special emphasis on  applications to education, health-care, virtual environments and physical activity.

CTSI seminar explores the effects of gestational iron deficiency on brain development

margotMargot Mayer-Proschel, PhD will present “Non-anemic gestational iron deficiency disrupts brain development: Risk factor for psychiatric disorders?” at the Tuesday, November 5th session of the CTSI Seminar Series. Dr. Mayer-Proschel summarizes the seminar:

Using a murine model we show that gestational iron deficiency (ID) impairs specific cellular populations in the fetal brain at the level of specification and/or migration. We provide evidence of the mechanisms by which ID leads to these quite specific impairments and discuss the consequences of these impairments on the development of cognitive function.

The theme of the Fall CTSI Seminar Series is “From Test Tube to Table: Understanding the Evolving Science of Nutrition Research.” The series takes place on Tuesdays from 12:15-1:15 pm in the Helen Wood Hall Auditorium. You can access the full schedule here. Lunch is provided. Please provide your own beverage. The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry designates this live educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.